Tim Wolcott

Tim Wolcott

[URIS id=2261]

Landscape photographer Timothy Wolcott uses his camera to capture nature’s ethereal moments. The otherworldly essence and liberating Creative artistry was Tim’s lineage and destiny. The Wolcott family celebrates 175 years in photography in 2014, anchored in his forefather Alexander Wolcott’s invention of creating the first camera and photo studio in 1839, a year later, the first photo exhibit was exhibited in Washington D.C. in 1840.

Born in Dubuque, Iowa in 1965, Tim was exposed to the photographic process at an early age, including time spent in his father’s darkroom at his childhood home. As six, Tim started making his own images and, in high school, honed his photographic interests to include fine art images. Using a 4×5 Zone VI Camera, Tim exposed the wind-swept countryside circling his home, winning two Kodak Photography contests.

“I seemed to understand landscapes early on and
that the magic of the image came back to life in the darkroom.”

Continuing on in this vein, Tim received an education grant from the state of Wisconsin. While attending college, Tim worked under noted commercial photographer Bruce Weber. Weber’s ability to create in-studio masterpieces from commercial elements struck Tim the most.

“What I loved about working for Bruce was to see him
put pieces together that later made the image a masterpiece.”

In 1983, Tim began study under photographer George Philips, a colleague of Ansel Adams. It was under Philips, Tim began to master the nuances of fine art black and white printing. By 1988, Tim was showing his work with the Association of InternationalPhotography Art Dealers (AIPAD). He was one of AIPAD’s youngest photographers at the time.

Drawing inspiration from Ansel Adam’s lifelong goal to attain pigment printing in color photography, Tim joined two others to pioneer the Evercolor Pigment Printing Process, the first method to allow photographers to produce truly archival images with saturation and tonal qualities that had not been achieved in color imaging. Tim continues to utilize the Evercolor system to produce environmentally sound and virtually non-fading photos. This focus led to Tim’s continued commitment and interest in merging conventional printing systems with modern technology and to his consultation with digital-based brands.

“I borrow from the masters before me and with the new printing technologies
I’ve achieved; I am keeping the traditions alive and creating my own unique style of art.”

Introduced to the head of conservation at Smithsonian in 1997, Tim proposed a project that would create exact replicas of extremely rare ephemera, such as important historic images and documents, with an end goal of release to the public. Up until then the rarity of these artifacts, including early civil war stills, Wright Brothers flight images, and portraits of the Great Sioux Chief by J.A. Anderson, had been barred due to their value. Tim’s practice for preservation of these collections was featured on PBS in 2003 and his connection with Smithsonian continues today: in 2009 and 2010, they named him Best Landscape Photographer.

Enthusiasts of Tim’s work range from private to corporate collectors, including Guggenheim, Photokina, Microsoft, Kaiser Permanente, Chevron and the Nature Conservancy. His images have been exhibited at Fahey Klein Gallery, Photography West, Vision Gallery, Photocollect, and Grubel Gallery. Tim’s persistence in documenting history via art led him to publish two coffee-table books. The first, Along the Water’s Edge, features essays alongside images Tim made over the last 20 years. For the Love of Texas, Tim’s second foray into publishing, features spring landscapes of Washington County with commentary from notable Texans, including George W. Bush, Lance Armstrong and Nolan Ryan.

In 2000, Tim realized a dream to open the first green gallery in the world. Dedicated to showcasing his own work and the artistic talents of others, Gallery of the American Landscape is located in Southern California’s iconic high country of Big Bear Lake.
In 2012, Tim created a revolutionary new printing process. This proprietary new paper combined with a proprietary new coating is considered to be the finest pigment printing process on the planet. This proprietary printing process allows the art lover to have a visual experience, to see the artwork without the use of glass or plexiglass. This innovative new printing process creates the most realistic luminant photographs known to mankind. This process is also green and is the longest lasting process in the world.

Timothy Landscape photographer Timothy Wolcott uses his camera to capture nature’s ethereal moments. The otherworldly essence and liberating quality of his fine art prints document the natural topography found across the continental United States. Crisp details illustrate his technical precision at capturing color and black and white images.

Creative artistry was Tim’s lineage and destiny. The Wolcott family celebrates 175 years in photography in 2014, anchored in his forefather Alexander Wolcott’s invention of creating the first camera and photo studio in 1839, a year later, the first photo exhibit was exhibited in Washington D.C. in 1840. Born in Dubuque, Iowa in 1965, Tim was exposed to the photographic process at an early age, including time spent in his father’s darkroom at his childhood home. As six, Tim started making his own images and, in high school, honed his photographic interests to include fine art images. Using a 4×5 Zone VI Camera, Tim exposed the wind-swept countryside circling his home, winning two Kodak Photography contests.

“I seemed to understand landscapes early on and
that the magic of the image came back to life in the darkroom.”

Continuing on in this vein, Tim received an education grant from the state of Wisconsin. While attending college, Tim worked under noted commercial photographer Bruce Weber. Weber’s ability to create in-studio masterpieces from commercial elements struck Tim the most.

“What I loved about working for Bruce was to see him
put pieces together that later made the image a masterpiece.”

In 1983, Tim began study under photographer George Philips, a colleague of Ansel Adams. It was under Philips, Tim began to master the nuances of fine art black and white printing. By 1988, Tim was showing his work with the Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD). He was one of AIPAD’s youngest photographers at the time.

Drawing inspiration from Ansel Adam’s lifelong goal to attain pigment printing in color photography, Tim joined two others to pioneer the Evercolor Pigment Printing Process, the first method to allow photographers to produce truly archival images with saturation and tonal qualities that had not been achieved in color imaging. Tim continues to utilize the Evercolor system to produce environmentally sound and virtually non-fading photos. This focus led to Tim’s continued commitment and interest in merging conventional printing systems with modern technology and to his consultation with digital-based brands.

“I borrow from the masters before me and with the new printing technologies
I’ve achieved; I am keeping the traditions alive and creating my own unique style of art.”

Introduced to the head of conservation at Smithsonian in 1997, Tim proposed a project that would create exact replicas of extremely rare ephemera, such as important historic images and documents, with an end goal of release to the public. Up until then the rarity of these artifacts, including early civil war stills, Wright Brothers flight images, and portraits of the Great Sioux Chief by J.A. Anderson, had been barred due to their value. Tim’s practice for preservation of these collections was featured on PBS in 2003 and his connection with Smithsonian continues today: in 2009 and 2010, they named him Best Landscape Photographer. Enthusiasts of Tim’s work range from private to corporate collectors, including Guggenheim, Photokina, Microsoft, Kaiser Permanente, Chevron and the Nature Conservancy. His images have been exhibited at Fahey Klein Gallery, Photography West, Vision Gallery, Photocollect, and Grubel Gallery.

Tim’s persistence in documenting history via art led him to publish two coffee-table books. The first, Along the Water’s Edge, features essays alongside images Tim made over the last 20 years. For the Love of Texas, Tim’s second foray into publishing, features spring landscapes of Washington County with commentary from notable Texans, including George W. Bush, Lance Armstrong and Nolan Ryan.

In 2000, Tim realized a dream to open the first green gallery in the world. Dedicated to showcasing his own work and the artistic talents of others, Gallery of the American Landscape is located in Southern California’s iconic high country of Big Bear Lake.

In 2012, Tim created a revolutionary new printing process. This proprietary new paper combined with a proprietary new coating is considered to be the finest pigment printing process on the planet. This proprietary printing process allows the art lover to have a visual experience, to see the artwork without the use of glass or plexiglass. This innovative new printing process creates the most realistic luminant photographs known to mankind. This process is also green and is the longest lasting process in the world.

 

By | 2015-10-22T17:10:40+00:00 October 22nd, 2015|Showcase Shooter|0 Comments